State Stories

8

The IHSA Celebrates the 50th Anniversary of Title IX

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The 2021-22 school year marks the 50th anniversary of Title IX. This landmark moment for female students led to a movement here in Illinois, where over 140,000 female high school athletes now compete annually across 18 IHSA sports. The opportunities for today’s athletes were built on the perseverance of those who came before. Throughout the school year, the IHSA will be sharing content related to the IHSA and the 50th anniversary of Title IX. See the content below and also be sure to follow #TitleIXat50 on social media, as the NFHS provides a national perspective on this momentous legislation...
 



Katrina M. Adams won IHSA Girls Tennis Singles State Championships in 1983 and 1984 at Whitney Young High School in Chicago, before she went on to win a Big Ten Championship at Northwestern University. After a pro career, she rose to become President and CEO of the United States Tennis Association—the first black woman and youngest person ever to hold that position. Katrina shares her Title IX story alongside long-time Whitney Young principal Dr. Joyce Kenner, one of the longest tenured and most respected principals in CPS history, who has also been an enduring advocate for female athletes throughout her tenure. The second video then features a discussion with legendary IHSA Girls Tennis Coach and State Tournament Manager Jean Walker. The fieldhouse at Prospect High School is named in Walker's honor, in part for her tireless advocacy for female high school athletics and her pioneering role in organizing many of the IHSA's early state tournaments for girls.







Legendary IHSA Figure Ola Bundy Blazed New Trails For Female High School Athletes


During her 29-year career as an Illinois High School Association administrator, Ola Bundy shepherded girls athletics from the early days of the Girls Athletic Association (GAA, a precursor to the IHSA adding girls’ sports) and postal tournaments to a full-scale, 12-sport, interscholastic state tournament lineup that was every bit the equivalent of boys programs. Today's female athlete owes a tremendous debt of gratitude to Miss Bundy  because many times it was only by the sheer force of her personality that she was able to persuade high school administrators to give girls athletics a fair shake. For her unceasing efforts she received many honors, capped by her induction into the National High School Sports Hall of Fame in 1996. Read more on Ola here and hear her 1996 interview below...


 





 

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